The Interactive Fiction Competition 2016 (Pt 2)

My first post on the comp explains how I chose pieces to review and what judging criteria I’m applying, so I won’t dwell on it here, and will instead get straight on to the next batch.

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The Interactive Fiction Competition 2016

I’ve been an avid follower of the IF comp for about five years now, have judged in the last few (you can too!) but have never blogged about it before. As the competition’s HUUUGE this year, I thought it only fair I pitch in by reporting back on at least enough to match IF.org’s judging criteria (five entries).

First of all, a few extra notes on my judging methods:

  1. I replayed as long as said replaying fitted within the allotted 2 hrs judging time, but only if I felt said replay would have an impact on my opinion on the game.
  2. I judged quite harshly on typos and even harsher on bugs, just because there are so many entries and so many are really great, it seems the only fair way to separate between some of them.
  3. I’ve used the scoring system as outlined by IF.org.
  4. I used the games page’s shuffle feature to randomly pick my five games, but may come back for more if I get time before judging closes.
  5. I’m trying to avoid major spoilers, but there may be mention of some story details, so if you want to go in completely cold, don’t read any further.

Anyway. ONWARD!

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A Dark Room of One’s Own

I awake to find myself in a dark room. Well, not awake so much as come round, groggily, after a long day at uni (thinking can be tiring, shut up!). But the room is dark. It’s screen two at Broadway Cinema. I’m already pretty familiar with the Dark Room, Mr John Roberston’s* highly inventive interactive videogame. It may seem strange to bother calling a videogame interactive, but Mr John Robertson’s game is, as I said, inventive, and so the term is apt. I’ve played the YouTube version: Continue reading

The Writing’s On The Wall

And it’s awesome

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Excuse my terrible photo. L-R Postcard versions of Who Am I?, A Princess Honeymoons In Our Town and Stalkers.

Storicodes was not your usual art exhibition. These works of art required you to get involved, whether mediating conversations between Arthur Seaton, Don Juan and Princess Finestra; helping a little fluffy creature discover his true identity; or using an inter-dimensional communication device to thwart an insidious enemy; standing and admiring the pretty pictures was only a tiny part of it. Continue reading